10th Circuit Upholds Insurer’s Application of Insured-Versus-Insured Exclusion to FDIC Receiver Claims

By Kimberly Forrester, Sedgwick San Francisco

Recently the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in BancInsure, Inc. v. F.D.I.C., Case No. 14-3063, 2015 WL 4647980, held that an insured-versus-insured exclusion unambiguously barred claims brought by the FDIC as a receiver against an insured bank’s former directors. The decision universally upheld the reasoning and holdings reached by the United States District Court for the District of Kansas in finding that the plain language of the insured-versus-insured exclusion provided for its extension to claims brought by receivers of the insured, including the FDIC. In reaching its holding, the court rejected the insured’s arguments that a shareholder derivative action exception, and a regulatory exclusion endorsement, in the insured’s policy superseded the insured-versus-insured exclusion or otherwise rendered it ambiguous with respect to claims brought by the FDIC.

The case arises out of a lawsuit filed by the FDIC in its capacity as receiver of the insured bank against the bank’s former directors and officers (D&O) alleging negligence, gross negligence, and breach of fiduciary duty. In response to the lawsuit, the insurer brought suit against the bank seeking a declaratory judgment that it owed no duty of coverage under the insured’s D&O policy pursuant to the insured-versus-insured exclusion in the bank’s policy, which provided:

The Insurer shall not be liable to make any payment for Loss in connection with any Claim made against the Insured Persons based upon, arising out of, relating to, in consequence of, or in any way involving…a Claim by, or on behalf of, or at the behest of, any other Insured Person, the Company, or any successor, trustee, assignee or receiver of the Company…

Neither party disputed that the FDIC brought the lawsuit in its capacity as receiver of the bank. Instead, the Insured argued that, when the insured-versus-insured exclusion was read in light of other policy provisions, in particular the shareholder derivative exception and the regulatory exclusion endorsement, the exclusion was ambiguous as to whether it barred claims asserted by the FDIC.

The Policy included a shareholder derivative action exception which removed from the scope of the insured-versus-insured exclusion “a shareholder’s derivative action brought on behalf of the Company by one or more shareholders who are not Insured Persons and make a Claim without the cooperation or solicitation of any Insured Person or the Company.” Because the FDIC succeeds to all rights of a failed bank, including those of any stockholder, the Insured argued that actions by the FDIC share common characteristics with a shareholder derivative action such that the insured-versus-insured exclusion was inapplicable or at least ambiguous. The court rejected the Insured’s argument, emphasizing the explicit inclusion of “receiver” in the insured-versus-insured exclusion and concluding that the shareholder derivative action exception “cannot overcome the plain language of the policy.”

The Policy also included a regulatory exclusion endorsement, which eliminated a policy exclusion for “any action or proceeding brought by or on behalf of any federal or state regulatory or supervisory agency or deposit insurance organization,” and set forth an aggregate liability cap of $5 million for claims brought by such agencies. The Insured argued that the maximum aggregate liability cap provided coverage over claims previously excluded under the regulatory exclusion such that the endorsement should prevail over the original printed provisions of the Policy, including the insured-versus-insured exclusion. The Insured further argued that the endorsement evidenced “a clear intent to provide coverage” for actions previously excluded under the regulatory exclusion. Rejecting the Insured’s arguments, the court reasoned that, “removing an exclusion is not the same thing as affirmatively providing coverage.” The court further emphasized that an inference of coverage cannot be created from the deletion of an exclusion, especially where the endorsement clearly states the parties’ intent not to vary or waive other limitations of the policy. The court also rejected the Insured’s assertions that the regulatory action endorsement would be rendered meaningless by application of the insured-versus-insured exclusion, stating that “the mere overlap between the two exclusions does not introduce ambiguity into the plain language of the insured-versus-insured exclusion barring coverage of claims by ‘any…receiver of the Company.’”

The court’s holding reaffirms that an endorsement providing additional coverage is still subject to other policy exclusions and limitations, particularly when the endorsement explicitly provides that it does not alter, vary, or waive other policy provisions. Further, the court’s refusal to allow the regulatory exclusion endorsement to supersede the insured-versus-insured exclusion reinforces that courts will interpret policies as a whole. Thus, when endorsements are clear that they only affect designated parts of the policy, insureds may face an uphill battle in their efforts to broadly create affirmative coverage that was not intended by the insurers.

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